Delaware Extreme Heat

Climate change means more mosquito days, increasing Zika risk.

Delaware currently has an average of 10 dangerous heat days a year. By 2050, it is projected to see this increase five-fold to 50 such days a year.

More than 20,000 people living in Delaware are especially vulnerable to extreme heat.

As the planet continues to warm from the increase in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the temperatures that we consider to be normal are also rising.

Delaware ties with Arizona as the fourth-fastest warming state in the nation, based on annual temperature trends since 1970.

What's Happening with Extreme Heat?

North Carolina

Sinking Atlantic Coastline Meets Rapidly Rising Seas

New research using GPS and prehistoric data has shown that nearly the entire coast is affected, from Massachusetts to Florida and parts of Maine... More

Virginia

Sea Level Rise Could Help Marshes Ease Flooding

Newly published modeling shows that a looming acceleration in sea level rise could further accelerate the spread of marshes worldwide... More

Georgia

What a Warmer Future Means for Southeastern Wildfires

Tinder-dry conditions that have resulted from months with little to no rain and toasty fall temperatures have allowed the fires to reach unusual heights. More

New York

Sandy’s Surge Was Extreme. It Could Become Normal

The risk posed by future storms like Sandy is only going to increase due to climate change. The potential for stronger storms and rising seas mean Sandy-level flooding could could occur once every 23 years as opposed to once every 400... More

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