Kansas Extreme Heat

An increase in stagnant summer air is expected to continue across the U.S.

Heat itself is one of the leading weather-related killers, and it’s also a significant contributing factor in creating ground-level ozone, which is a serious health hazard.

Kansas currently averages about 35 dangerous heat days a year. By 2050, the state is projected to see this double to 70 such days a year.

More than 70,000 people living in Kansas are especially vulnerbale to extreme heat. 

Cities tend to be warmer than the surrounding countryside, a phenomenon known as an urban heat island.

What's Happening with Extreme Heat?

Kansas

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Georgia

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New York

Sandy’s Surge Was Extreme. It Could Become Normal

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Climate Change Behind Surge in Western Wildfires

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